ADHD and your child

I recently presented on ADHD across the age spectrum at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Here are some neat facts and figures from the presentation I hope you find helpful

  1. ADHD is the actual diagnosis-there is no such diagnosis as “ADD”1.
    1. Diagnostic criteria
      1. A child or adolescent needs to meet six out of nine possible inattentive symptoms and/or six out of nine possible hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms.
      2. ADHD has three iterations: (1) predominantly inattentive, (2) predominantly hyperactive/impulsive, and (3) combined, based on how many symptoms in each diagnostic category an individual meets.
        1. 6 or more symptoms of inattention:
          1. Poor attention to detail poor sustained attention
          2. Poor task completion poor organization
          3. Procrastination distractibility
          4. Forgetfulness
      3. 6 or more symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity:
        • Behaving as “driven by a motor”
        • Excessive talking interrupting
        • Difficulty waiting one’s turn
        • Fidgeting leaving one’s seat
  1. 3-5% of child and adolescent populations have ADHD, some studies reporting as high as 11% (Michielsen et al., 2013).
  2. 10% of preschool children (ages 2-5) will have pre-pathological ADHD behaviors that begin to emerge.
  3. Highest rate of comorbidity is with externalizing disorders  (conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder) and secondarily, Depression and generalized anxiety were among the most comorbid internalizing disorders.
  4. 20-30% of children (<18 years of age) will have a diagnosable, comorbid anxiety disorder with ADHD.
  5. CBT treatment has better effectiveness rates than stimulant medication (longer-lasting).

More on this topic in the next blog!

 

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Author:

I am a clinical psychologist with approximately 15 years of experience assessing and treating anxiety and depressive disorders in young children, adolescents, young adults, adults and geriatric populations. I completed a 6-year predoctoral training award at the National Institute of Mental Health, and postdoctoral training at the Anxiety Disorders Center at the Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital. From my clinical and research experiences, I have come to see the struggles of many families deciding when to pursue professional help and feeling very lost in the process. I will address several mental health issues that will help educate and empower my readers to make better mental health decisions for themselves. Welcome to my blog! Johanna Kaplan, Ph.D. Disclaimer-This blog is not and cannot be used in replace of formal therapy. This blog is used to inform and educate and is not a form of informal or formal advice.

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